Gluten Free Diet

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Eight years ago, Susie Hanford was diagnosed with coeliac disease. Hundreds of thousands of Aussies have it, but many remain undiagnosed.

"I was very tired, very thin, very pale, my stomach was bloated. I just felt really unwell," Susie says.

What it means, is that Susie's body can't tolerate gluten, a protein found in things like wheat, barley and oats.

"Eight years ago, it took me at least two hours to go shopping, and I would come home and go, 'ok, what am I going to eat'?"

So, while the rest of the family enjoys a regular diet, Susie's meals are now heavily restricted. But what an incredible difference the change has made.

"I started to feel like I was waking up, the fog was clearing," she said.

Darryl Rogers is another one of a growing number of south Australians who've recently adopted a gluten-free diet.

"Before I was diagnosed with a wheat problem, I had a lot of trouble, with poor digestion, gut problems, bloating, lethargy, problems with mood swings," Darryl says.

But the real challenge for Darryl, and many others like him, is not only what to eat, but where in Adelaide to find it.

"It's very difficult to find things that you can make at home to eat, let alone going out and trying to find foods that you can eat, going out with friends, etc."

But that's slowly starting to change. Just two months ago, Helen Brown opened this gluten-free mini-mart and cafe at Darlington, and says it was driven by customer demand.

"I think as people realise that the number of people [that are] intolerant or allergic to different diets and different foods [is growing], they're becoming aware that they have to cater so they can keep up that sort of trade," Helen said.

In fact, many restaurants and cafes in Adelaide are now noticing the trend.

In North Adelaide, Cafe Vagabondo and Najjar's Cafe have started offering gluten-free meals and desserts. If it's pizza you're after, Goodlife Organic Pizzas do gluten-free bases, while Parisi's restaurant has now started to do the same.

Even gluten-free beer is now on offer at the Organic Market and Cafe at Stirling. And the list just keeps on growing.

"You have to ask, I mean we've rung a few places and said: 'we'd like to come for tea' and they'll say: 'no, sorry we can't do that', or they'll say: 'yes', and they'll offer you a couple of things or a huge range of things, but you always have to ask," Susie says.

If you need help, more places to eat, or more information on gluten-free diets try the Coeliac Society of South Australia.

CONTACTS:

COELIAC SOCIETY OF SA
SHOP 5/188 GLYBURN ROAD HECTORVILLE
(08) 8356 1488

CAF� VAGABONDO
41a O'CONNELL STREET, NORTH ADELAIDE
(08) 8239 2311

NAJJARS CAF�
21-23 O'CONNELL STREET, NORTH ADELAIDE
(08) 8239 1860

KYLIE'S GLUTEN FREE BAKERY
598 GOODWOOD ROAD, DAW PARK
(08) 8374 4002

FLAGSTAFF CAF� AND ALL MANNA OF GLUTEN FREE
1500 SOUTH ROAD, DARLINGTON
8377 0311

PARISI'S RESTAURANT
613 MAGILL ROAD, MAGILL
(08) 8331 8844

MONTEZUMA'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT
134 MELBOURNE STREET, NORTH ADELAIDE
(08) 8239 0949

GOODLIFE MODERN ORGANIC PIZZA
170 HUTT STREET, ADELAIDE
(08) 8223 2618

ORGANIC MARKET & CAF�
5 DRUIDS AVENUE, STIRLING
(08) 8339 4835

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